Posted in Affordable Care Act, disability civil rights, Health insurance, Jim abbott

Ask your Congressperson to Oppose the Latest Blow to Obamacare

I am writing to protest the Trump administration’s latest effort to deny health insurance to people who have pre-existing medical conditions.

This is very personal to me, because I have multiple sclerosis. So did my mother and my grandmother. But I now have many more opportunities than they did to slow down the progression of my disease through the use of new medications.

The problem is that these medications can cost up to $40,000.00 a year. That’s why the Affordable Care Act (ACA) was such a godsend. Among the many ways it protects people is by making it unlawful for insurance companies to deny coverage for people with pre-existing conditions.

But as mentioned above, the current administration is trying to destroy these protections, one stealthy step at a time. The latest tactic is a new federal regulation that would make it legal for insurance companies to offer “short term” insurance plans that do not have the same protections as the ACA.

And yes, it would again be legal to deny coverage for people because of pre-existing conditions.

As of now, this rule is scheduled to take effect at the end of September. I urge everyone to put pressure on their elected representatives to stop the further victimization of people who are already so vulnerable.

See the links below for more information.

https://pulse.ncpolicywatch.org/2018/08/01/skimpy-health-insurance-plans-pre-existing-conditions

https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2018/08/01/634539877/under-new-rules-cheaper-short-term-health-care-plans-now-last-up-to-three-years

Posted in Accesibility for People with disabilities, Baseball, disability civil rights, Disability sterotypes, Jim abbott

Avoiding Discrimination is a Proud Part of America’s National Pastime.

Even though Jim Abbott was born without a right hand, he won a gold medal for the 1988 U.S. Olympic baseball team and threw a no- hitter for the New York Yankees. Curtis Pride and Pete Gray, both outfielders, are deaf. And John Lester and Anthony Rizzo, Chicago Cubs and cancer survivors, recently presented their long-suffering  fans with a World Series title.

They and other baseball players with disabilities were honored in 2015 by Topps Baseball Cards. In commemoration  of the 25th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act, Topps launched a series of baseball cards honoring players with disabilities.

“People with disabilities are often looked at for what they can’t do instead of being appreciated for what they can do…Imagine if a child or the parent of a child with a disability, by simply opening a pack of baseball cards, discovers that one or their heroes was legally blind or deaf or has battled cancer? They should truly feel empowered and encouraged,” said the Cubs’ medical director Mark O’Neal.

And just a few days ago, the Kansas City Royals signed the first baseball player with autism.

Baseball has a long and proud history of being among the first American institutions to break civil rights barriers. They did it with Jackie Robinson and other racial minorities, and they have also done it with players with disabilities.

Of course,  baseball is dimished if people can’t watch it. So in my next post, I’ll talk about the progress made in allowing spectators with disabilities into baseball games.


See the two USA Today articles below (as well as Joe Shapiro’s facebook page) for more information.

https://www.royalsreview.com/2018/4/2/17190224/royals-sign-player-believed-to-be-first-professional-baseball-player-with-autism

https://www.usatoday.com/story/sports/mlb/2015/10/21/topps-to-feature-cards-of-players-who-overcame-disabilities-pride–perseverance/74314206/